International Students:good information crucial to recognising human rights issues

This paper written in collaboration with Dr Devaki Monani, analyses the social science perspectives that can help us understand the past and project the future of the international students situation in Australia. The paper was commissioned by Universities Australia, the Human Rights Commission and the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, to draw on social science research through a human rights lens. The paper does not reflect the views of the commissioning bodies, though the AHRC has a campaign to press the federal government to move forward on human rights issues for international students.

Download the paper here.

International student movement rising, paper warns – Campus Review

International Students flee Indifferent Country – The Australian

Human Rights “lost in action” – UTS News

Introduction

The attraction, retention, well-being and quality of outcomes for international students have become major policy and political issues in Australia and in many of the students’ countries of origin. In Australia the perceived range of environmental and social impacts of a rapidly growing international student presence has stimulated public attention. The economic contribution of international students has also played a critical role in Australia’s survival through the global financial crisis, buffering the Australian dollar and sustaining a higher level of service sector export income than almost any other nation ….

2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Fresher than ever.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 9,000 times in 2010. That’s about 22 full 747s.

 

In 2010, there were 6 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 9 posts. There were 3 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 5mb.

The busiest day of the year was September 29th with 79 views. The most popular post that day was Australia’s migration policies: African dimensions.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were culturaldiversity.net.au, en.wikipedia.org, facebook.com, google.com.au, and search.conduit.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for andrew jakubowicz, professor andrew jakubowicz, jakubowicz, andrew jacubowicz, and social cohesion in australia.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Australia’s migration policies: African dimensions June 2010

2

About March 2009
4 comments

3

Race media and identity in Australia April 2010

4

Cultural Diversity in the New Australia: a Four Way Street March 2009

5

The risk of diversity: the meanings of integration in Australian political culture March 2009